Food Stamps for Disability Beneficiaries

People who receive Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability benefits may also be eligible for government benefits that help pay for food.If you are injured or sick and unable to work, you may also be living on limited income and resources. You and your family need a way of paying for life's essentials, such as food, clothing, and shelter. 

Are you having difficulty getting your disability claim approved? Every dollar is important if you're disabled and out of work. An SSI lawyer at the Coye Law Firm wants to help you. Call us for a free consultation.
 

Overview

Food stamps are distributed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and provide food for Americans with low income. To get food stamps, a person must be an American citizen or a legal immigrant living on limited income and resources. A person does not have to be disabled to get food stamps. The food stamps program requires that people between 18 and 60 register for a work program if they are not already employed.

Everyone in your household must have a Social Security number to apply for food stamps. They must also be:
  • a U.S. citizen
  • a U.S. national
  • an American Indian born in Canada or Mexico
  • a legal immigrant under age 18
  • a qualified alien according to the USDA's eligibility requirements

Requirements

There are income and resource limits for people who want to claim food stamps. An applicant's household or family cannot have more than $2,000 in resources unless there is a disabled person over the age of 60 living with them, in which case the limit is $3,000. Your exact income requirement is determined by the number of people who live in your home. If a member of your household is receiving disability payments, then your income requirement is determined by the net monthly income in the chart below. All other applicants must meet the gross monthly income standard.

Household Size
Gross Monthly Income
Net Monthly Income

1
$1,174
$903

2
$1,579
$1,215

3
$1,984
$1,526

4
$2,389
$1,838

5
$2,794
$2,150

6
$3,200
$2,461

7
$3,605
$2,773

8
$4,010
$3,085

each additional
$406
$312

Your income and household size determine the amount of assistance you can get. The more you spend on things such as rent, a mortgage, monthly utilities, and child or elder care, the less benefits you are eligible to receive. 

Household Size
Maximum Monthly Payment

1
$200

2
$367

3
$526

4
$668

5
$793

6
$952

7
$1,052

8
$1,202

each additional
$150

To calculate how much money you will receive each month, multiply your net income by .3 and round it up to the nearest dollar. Then, subtract that amount from the maximum monthly allotment that corresponds to your household size.
 

Eligibility Example

Your net monthly income is $1,000. Multiply this number by .3, which equals $300. Your household size is 3 people, so deduct $300 from $526 (according to the chart above). $526-$300 = $226, so your monthly checks will be for $226. 

The requirements for food stamps are nearly identical to the requirements for Supplemental Security Income benefits. If you are receiving disability benefits to make up for being out of work, apply for food stamps. There are may benefits available for people living at this low level of income. Contact the Coye Law Firm's SSI attorneys to make sure you are getting the most benefits you are entitled to.