The World Health Organization is calling it an “infodemic”, but can we even believe that? In a time where information is constantly accessible, it can be difficult to decide which news is worth your time. Luckily, we have provided some simple tips to stay safe from Coronavirus fake news. 

 

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1. Use reputable sources

 

Let's start with the obvious: always check your source. Although no source is 100% flawless, there are several sources that have reputations of providing the most accurate and reliable information available at the time. These sources typically avoid the releasing of information that is rushed or unconfirmed.

Here are a few fairly neutral sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/
http://www.floridahealth.gov/
https://www.thelancet.com/journals/landia/onlinefirst

 

In addition, be attentive to the author. You may do a quick Google search to find that an author does not appear on any other platform. This is a red flag.

 

If you are still doubtful, cross check your references to see if the information matches up between at least a few sources.

 

2. Avoid major bold claims

 

Be wary of claims of a coronavirus cure or a vaccine. At the moment, there is no cure or foolproof prevention method. Anything that seems too good to be true is worth doubting. If you come across a story about the origins of coronavirus that is exciting, with a conspiracy ring to it, don't be so quick to fall for it. In general, you should be skeptical of bold statements that proclaim major advancements suddenly and quickly. Coronavirus is a topic full of uncertainty, and providing a sense of false certainty is a great way for sources to get clicks.

 

If someone tells you you can definitely get workers' compensation because you were sick with the virus, be doubtful. This is another topic full of uncertainty. Here is a link to our FAQ about workers' comp and COVID-19: https://www.coyelaw.com/faqs/frequently-asked-questions-about-covid-19-workers-comp.cfm

 

4. Avoid politicized sources

 

It is wise to be wary of news sources that are over-politicizing COVID-19. Although accountability should not be dismissed altogether, political sources love to find a scapegoat. Who is to blame? Trump, China, the WHO? Blaming someone for a crisis kills two birds with one stone: it pushes a political agenda (there is an upcoming election) and it gains attention.

 

5. Turn off your TV

 

Lastly, it may be smart to limit your intake of news altogether. While you’re sitting at home waiting for your stimulus check to roll in, avoid checking every half hour for coronavirus updates. It may be difficult to keep busy while social distancing, but limiting your intake to once or twice a day will help you to keep a clear mind and make logical decisions. The last thing you want is to allow this flood of information to cause you stress that may lead to injury in your everyday tasks (like driving or working).

 

Here at Coye Law Firm, your health and comfort is our first priority. For this reason, we are offering telephone and video conferences in place of in person meetings. In addition, all of our filing is done virtually and necessary paperwork (even notarizing) can be completed and signed electronically. If your law firm is not taking precautions to protect you and your family's health, give us a call today.

 

 

 

 

       

Call 407.648.4940 or contact the Coye Law Firm today for a free consultation about your case.

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