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Phone: (407) 648-4940

Your Personal Injury, Workers' Comp, Disability and Family Law Concerns Put to Rest

Even a minor accident can cause physical and financial confusion, worries, and setbacks. Allow us to help answer your questions and put your concerns to bed, so you can focus on your recovery. Why wait any longer to get the answers you need? Click here and see how our knowledge, advice, and experience can help you.

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  • Frequently Asked Questions about Treatment After an Accident

    How soon should I seek treatment?

    Seek treatment for personal injuries immediately. Your insurance company or the person you are seeking a claim against may be responsible for paying medical bills, so keep all paperwork you receive regarding the accident. The law dictates a certain timeline for notifying your insurance company of medical treatment. You are entitled for compensation of medical bills if you notify your insurance company within 30 days of the treatment. If you notify them within 21 days, you may have up to 60 days to seek all necessary treatments and file appropriate paperwork.

    Who will pay my medical bills?

    In Florida, drivers are required to have Personal Injury Protection under the no-fault system. This means that insured drivers have their own insurance companies pay the first 80% of $10,000 in medical bills. Beyond that, you may need your own health insurance or the other driver's insurance company to pay. Speaking with a personal injury lawyer at the Coye Law Firm can help you determine the source beyond $10,000.

    Do I have to go to my own doctor?

    You can go to any doctor capable of treating your injuries that resulted from the car accident. Make sure to coordinate the treatment with your insurance company and notify the car accident lawyer assigned to your case.

    Call 407.648.4940 or contact Coye Law Firm today for a free consultation about your case.

    The expert injury attorneys at Coye Law Firm are experienced with Florida, New York, Michigan, and District of Columbia law and are here to help the injured.

    If you'd like to learn more about injury law and your rights, read my book, Sharing the Secrets, Learning the Lies: A Guide to Florida Personal Injury

    Click here to receive your FREE copy now

    From this book you will learn… Personal Injury Book for consumers

    1. The ONE THING you must do within 14 days of your accident (page 42)
    2. The two most important factors in determining case value (page 10)
    3. How to understand what your insurance will and will not cover (chapter 3)
    4. 6 critical steps you must take after an accident (page 65)
    5. Why you should not trust the insurance company’s repair shop (page 72)
    6. How to choose the right doctor (chapter 5)
    7. The secrets to getting a fair settlement (chapter 10)
    8. An 8-step breakdown of the normal process for lawsuits (page 109)
    9. The one 4-letter word that might cost you (chapter 12)
    10. How to start gathering the most important evidence you need (page 75)
    11. …and more!

    Click here to receive your FREE copy now

  • Frequently Asked Questions about Wills

    What is a will?

    A will is a legal document written to ensure that a person's possessions or responsibilities are taken care of according to their wishes after their death. A will may include the appointment of a personal representative, along with the delineations of which beneficiaries will get what.

    What happens to probate assets if there is no will?

    To summarize, if there is no will, Florida statute who gets what depending on whom the decedent left behind (ie. spouse, children, parents, siblings). Otherwise known as Intestate Succession, the rules function a default plan to specify how assets are shared if it is not explicitly stated in the will, or if there is no will at all.

    Can a spouse be cut out of a will or trust?

    Legally, no. Florida law provides that the surviving spouse may receive an elective share of 30% of the decedent’s elective estate, unless there is a valid pre/post marital agreement. However, the election is not automatic, and is subject to strict election deadlines.

    We cannot locate the will. Now what?

    Florida law presumes that if the original document cannot be produced, it was the decedent’s intent that the document be destroyed. It is possible to overcome this presumption depending upon specific facts. If the presumption cannot be overcome, the probate process would then follow the intestate succession process instead.

    Whether it's a probate, will, trust, life insurance, or any other form of estate planning, the experienced attorneys of Coye Law Firm are here to help!

    Call 407.648.4940 or contact Coye Law Firm today for a free, private strategy session about your case.

    The expert estate planning attorneys at Coye Law Firm are experienced with Florida, New York, Michigan, and District of Columbia law and are here to help.

    Still have questions? Click here to receive your free download of my Probate Special Report: 

     

      This Special Report is yours to keep. There is absolutely no cost and no obligation to you.


    From my Probate Special Report you will learn...

    -The 13 responsibilities that a personal representative has. 

    -The 5 different ways a personal representative's fees may be determined. 

    -The 3 different ways a Probate attorney's fees may be determined.

    -All individuals who may be involved in the probate process.

    -What you need to organize in order to move the probate process along quicker.

    -What to do with leftover medical bills and Medicaid.

       and more...

    Click here to receive your free download of my Probate Special Report now!

  • Frequently Asked Questions about Probate Personal Representative

    What is a Personal Representative?

    The personal representative is the person, bank, or trust company appointed by the court to be in charge of the administration of the estate. Other terms used to describe the personal representative: executor, administrator.

    What is the Personal Representative responsible for accomplishing?

    The personal representative has a variety of responsibilities:

    • Identify, gather, evaluate, and safeguard all probate assets
    • Publish a “notice to creditors” giving notice of the administration of the estate, along with the requirements to file a claim
    • Serve a “notice of administration” to specific people to give notice of any requirements to file objections regarding the estate
    • Notify all reasonably ascertainable creditors
    • Object to improper claims and defend any resulting lawsuits
    • Pay valid claims
    • File tax returns
    • Pay taxes
    • Employ necessary professionals to assist in the process
    • Pay administrative expenses
    • Distribute assets to surviving family
    • Distribute assets to other beneficiaries
    • Close probate administration

    Who can be a Personal Representative?

    The personal representative can be an individual (usually stated in the will), a bank, or a trust company. To qualify as a personal representative, an individual must be either a Florida resident, or a spouse, sibling, parent, child, or other close relative of the decedent. Florida law provides for which persons have priority in serving as the personal representative in the event someone did not have a will.

    How are personal representative/attorney fees determined throughout the Probate process?

    Personal representative fees will be determined in one of five ways:

    • The fee is as stated in the will
    • The fee is determined in a contract between the personal representative and the decedent
    • Agreed upon between the personal representative and whoever is paying their fees (ie. Beneficiaries)
    • The amount presumed to be reasonable as calculated under the law, if the amount is without objection
    • Determined by the judge
    • The personal representative’s attorney’s fees will be determined in one of three ways:
    • As agreed upon by the attorney, the personal representative, and the persons paying the fee
    • The amount presumed to be reasonable as calculated under the law, if the amount is without objection
    • Determined by the judge

    Call 407.648.4940 or contact Coye Law Firm today for a free, private strategy session about your case.

    The expert estate planning attorneys at Coye Law Firm are experienced with Florida, New York, Michigan, and District of Columbia law and are here to help.

    Still have questions? Click here to receive your free download of my Probate Special Report: 

     

      This Special Report is yours to keep. There is absolutely no cost and no obligation to you.


    From my Probate Special Report you will learn...

    -The 13 responsibilities that a personal representative has. 

    -The 5 different ways a personal representative's fees may be determined. 

    -The 3 different ways a Probate attorney's fees may be determined.

    -All individuals who may be involved in the probate process.

    -What you need to organize in order to move the probate process along quicker.

    -What to do with leftover medical bills and Medicaid.

       and more...

    Click here to receive your free download of my Probate Special Report now!

  • Frequently Asked Questions about the Probate Process

    Who will be involved in the Probate Process?

    The following list includes those who may be involved in the probate process, depending on the financial situation of the decedent:

    • Clerk of the Circuit Court
    • Circuit Court Judge
    • Personal Representative/Executor
    • Personal Representative’s Attorney
    • Claimants (those who the decedent was in debt to – creditors, health care providers)
    • IRS (if the decedent owed any federal income taxes or estate taxes)
    • Florida Department of Revenue
    • Surviving family
    • Other beneficiaries

    Is probate necessary if there is a surviving spouse?

    Probate is necessary if the decedent owns ANY property solely in their name. If everything is part of a joint account or has a joint owner with rights of survivorship, then probate wouldn't be necessary.

    Do I need an attorney to go through the Probate process?

    Florida law requires a personal representative to retain an attorney unless the individual is the only interested party. However, the probate process is complex, and most non-attorneys would have a hard time working through it without the assistance of an attorney.

    Where do I file my Probate Paperwork?

    You should file all probate paperwork with the Clerk of the Circuit Court in the county where the decedent lived prior to death. There will usually be a filing fee, which must be paid upfront, to initiate the probate process. Appropriate paperwork, including the will must also be filed with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.

    Is it ever too late to start the probate process?

    The short answer is no. Probate initiation is technically plausible for several decades. However, the longer you wait, the more complicated the process may become. For example, if an original heir passes away, then their inheritance would transfer to their own estate, and so on. You could also be subject to other statute of limitations (ie. Electing to take an undivided one-half interest in the homestead estate as a tenant in common must be done within 6 months). The sooner you begin the probate process, the smoother it will go, barring any disputes among beneficiaries.

    Who pays the bills of the decedent?

    Unless you were a co-signer on a loan or account to which debt was owed, the beneficiaries are not responsible. However, the estate is. All properly filed claims of debtors will be paid out before anything is transferred to the beneficiaries.

    Who will supervise the Probate process and make final decisions?

    A Circuit Court Judge will preside over the probate process. He or She will assess the validity of a will, appoint a personal representative, if necessary, and insure that assets are divided in accordance with Florida Law.

    Is the decedent’s life insurance policy included in Probate?

    It depends. If the life insurance policy has a named beneficiary, then typically the insurance company will release the funds directly to that person after the paperwork is filed. If there is no named beneficiary, then the life insurance policy will be processed as part of the estate. If processed as part of the Estate, the proceeds are subject to creditors claims. If the policy is paid to a named beneficiary, then those funds are exempt from creditors claims. The only exception to paying the proceeds to a named beneficiary is if the funds are necessary to fund a spouse’s elective share.

    Call 407.648.4940 or contact Coye Law Firm today for a free, private strategy session about your case.

    The expert estate planning attorneys at Coye Law Firm are experienced with Florida, New York, Michigan, and District of Columbia law and are here to help.

    Still have questions? Click here to receive your free download of my Probate Special Report: 

     

      This Special Report is yours to keep. There is absolutely no cost and no obligation to you.


    From my Probate Special Report you will learn...

    -The 13 responsibilities that a personal representative has. 

    -The 5 different ways a personal representative's fees may be determined. 

    -The 3 different ways a Probate attorney's fees may be determined.

    -All individuals who may be involved in the probate process.

    -What you need to organize in order to move the probate process along quicker.

    -What to do with leftover medical bills and Medicaid.

       and more...

    Click here to receive your free download of my Probate Special Report now!

  • Frequently Asked Questions about Probate

    What is Probate?

    Probate is the process by which the court identifies and gathers a decedent’s assets. Through the probate process, all taxes, claims, and expenses are paid, and assets are distributed among beneficiaries. The probate code can be found in Title XLII of the Florida Statutes. There are two types of probate administration, Formal Administration and Summary Administration.

    What is Formal Probate Administration?

    Formal Probate Administration is the required proceeding when Summary Administration is either not appropriate or not selected by the interested parties. A personal representative is required for Formal Probate Administration.

    What is Summary Probate Administration?

    Summary Probate Administration is a shortened proceeding to administer an estate. Summary administration is allowed if more than two years have elapsed since the date of decedents death, or if the assets involved total LESS than $75,000. A personal representative is not required for Summary Probate Administration. However, the beneficiaries of a summary administration remain responsible for all creditor claims that are discovered in a timely fashion.

    What are considered assets in Probate Administration?

    Probate assets are those items of value that were owned solely by the decedent. These assets must not have a provision for automatic succession, other wise they will not be considered probate assets. For example, bank accounts, real estate (but not the homestead property), and a life insurance payable to the decedent’s estate are all probate assets, but trust funds, joint bank accounts, life insurance policies payable to an individual, or real estate owned jointly would not be.

    Still have questions? Click here to receive your free download of my Probate Special Report: 

     

      This Special Report is yours to keep. There is absolutely no cost and no obligation to you.


    From my Probate Special Report you will learn...

    -The 13 responsibilities that a personal representative has. 

    -The 5 different ways a personal representative's fees may be determined. 

    -The 3 different ways a Probate attorney's fees may be determined.

    -All individuals who may be involved in the probate process.

    -What you need to organize in order to move the probate process along quicker.

    -What to do with leftover medical bills and Medicaid.

       and more...

    Click here to receive your free download of my Probate Special Report now!

     

  • Frequently Asked Questions about SSD Appeals

    What is the first step in the appeals process?

    After you receive a denial letter, you need to notify the Social Security Administration that you'd like to file a Request for Reconsideration. You or an attorney can do this by completing and sending Form SSA-561-U2 back to the SSA's offices.

    How long does an appeal take?

    The appeals process can take a long time. There are four stages in appealing a denied disability claim, but if you are successful at any of them, the process stops. The first step, request for reconsideration, can take up to a year if the SSA requires you to get more medical consultation and exams. The average amount of time needed to process a hearing with an administrative law judge, the next step, was 514 days in 2008. The Appeals Council Review and filing a suit in federal court can take a lot of time to process and resolve depending on the circumstances of your case.

    What happens if I don't make the deadline?

    If you don't appeal the decision within 60 days, you need to reapply for disability benefits. After the 60 day deadline passes, your application is discarded because the Social Security Administration handles millions of applications a year and cannot keep old ones.

    Can I still get a check while I am appealing the decision to stop benefits?

    Yes, in some cases. If you appeal a decision to stop benefits based on the fact that your condition is no longer disabling, you can continue getting a monthly check while you appeal. If you receive SSI payments and are appealing a decision to stop them, you can request that the Social Security Administration continue to pay them while you appeal.

    What if you don't agree with Social Security's decision?

    Appeal. As soon as you get the notice of denial, start the appeal process by calling an attorney at the Coye Law Firm to help you. You have 60 days to notify the SSA that you'd like to appeal their decision, so you have no time to waste.

    The attorneys of the Coye Law Firm want to guide you through the disability process. If your claim has been denied, you need someone to fight for you and work within the Social Security Administration's complex appeals process. Call us today for a free consultation.

    How long do I have to file an appeal?

    You have 60 days from the date you received your denial letter to appeal the decision.

    What if I don't agree with the date they say my disability started?

    You can appeal. If you feel that you are entitled to benefits starting from an earlier time than the SSA determined, contact an attorney to begin the appeals process. Some claimants are awarded more benefits because they can provide more or better documentation for their conditions.

    Call 407.648.4940 or contact Coye Law Firm today for a free consultation about your case.

    The expert disability attorneys at Coye Law Firm are experienced with Florida, New York, Michigan, and District of Columbia law and are here to help the disabled.

    social security disability information

    Looking For More Information About Disability Law and Benefits?

    Download an absolutely free copy of my Special Report on disability benefits.

    This invaluable resource is yours to keep with absolutely no obligation to us!

    My report explains the basics of disability benefits, and gives a few hints and tricks that could speed up your disability claim. 

    Click here to request a copy now.

     

  • Frequently Asked Questions about the SSD Process

    Do I need medical records from my doctor?

    A lot of people file applications online, so they submit their medical evidence separately. You will be asked to provide contact names, phone numbers, and addresses for your doctors and treatment sources. You will also be asked about your work history, so be prepared to share this information.

    The Coye Law Firm wants to help you win benefits after your first application. Call our offices to speak with an attorney who can schedule you for a free consultation and guide you to a successful claim.

    I won't need benefits for about 2 months. Can I wait?

    Don't wait to apply for benefits. The application and decision process takes a lot of time, and you might not even be approved for benefits immediately. Apply for benefits as soon as you qualify. The Coye Law Firm wants to help you win benefits after your first application. Call our offices to speak with an attorney who can schedule you for a free consultation and guide you to a successful claim.

    Where do I apply?

    Apply for disability benefits online at the Social Security Administration's website, or explore our Qualifying & Applying for Social Security Benefits page. Applying for Supplemental Security Income is more in-depth and requires a personal meeting with a representative at a local social security office. Enter your zip code on their website to find an office near you .

    How will I receive my benefits if my application is accepted?

    Beneficiaries can receive their payments in the form of a check or through direct deposit. The checks are sent through the mail and payments are made monthly.

    How long does it take to hear about my application?

    Three to five months. You will receive a letter in the mail letting you know whether or not your benefits were approved or denied. To check the status of your application, you can look it up online or call the Social Security Administration at 1-800-772-1213. The attorneys of the Coye Law Firm want to guide you through the disability process. If your claim has been denied, you need someone to fight for you and work within the Social Security Administration's complex appeals process. Call us today for a free consultation.

    Does my SSI/SSD approval entitle me to any other benefits?

    Yes. If your application for Social Security Disability benefits is approved, you can get Medicare coverage to help offset the cost of your medical care. Supplemental Security Income recipients can get Medicaid and food stamps to help them pay for essential services.

    When will my benefits stop?

    Your benefits continue for the length of your disability, until you return to substantial gainful activity, or become disqualified in any other way. When you reach retirement age, your Social Security disability benefits continue, but are called "retirement benefits" instead.

    How the Social Security Administration verify information

    When you apply for benefits, you will be asked to sign a document (either in person or online) that lets the Social Security Administration get records from your doctor. To verify your financial information, you may need to give the SSA copies of your tax returns or bank statements.

    Do benefits change from month to month?

    Not unless your income changes. Because SSI benefits are determined by deducting your income from a federal rate, your benefits will decrease if your income increases. SSD benefits are determined by your past work, so it is less likely that these benefits will change during your disability.

    How long does the application for benefits from the SSA take?

    The application for SSD benefits has three parts: the application itself, the disability report, and the form allowing your doctor to give medical information to the SSA. SSI also has three parts: the disability report, the form, and an interview either in-person or on the phone. Any of these steps can take a long time, especially the interview or mailing the form.

    The Coye Law Firm wants to help you win benefits after your first application. Call our offices to speak with an attorney who can schedule you for a free consultation and guide you to a successful claim.

     

    Call 407.648.4940 or contact Coye Law Firm today for a free consultation about your case.

    The expert disability attorneys at Coye Law Firm are experienced with Florida, New York, Michigan, and District of Columbia law and are here to help the disabled.

    Looking For More Information About Disability Law and Benefits?                                 Download an absolutely free copy of my Special Report on disability benefits.
    This invaluable resource is yours to keep with absolutely no obligation to us!

    My report explains the basics of disability benefits, and gives a few hints and tricks that could speed up your disability claim. 

    • 3 requirements you need to qualify for disability (Page 5)
    • The vital and crucial KEY to your disability claim (Page 7)
    • How to appeal a denied claim (Page 9)
    • How to maximize your benefits by combining different cases (Page 11)
    • Nine important tips to help win your disability case (Page 13)
    • And much more...

    Click here to request a copy now.

  • Frequently Asked Questions about Qualifying for SSD

    If my health improves enough for me to go back to work, do I lose my disability payments?

    The Social Security Administration has a work incentive program to assist people who can return to employment. The Administration recognizes that this may be easier said than done, however. They set up a trial work period of nine months that allows beneficiaries to test their ability to work while still receiving Social Security benefits. More information on their policies can be found here.

    Does workers' comp affect my social security disability benefits? What about unemployment?

    You can receive both social security disability benefits and workers compensation at the same time. However, your workers compensation check will be reduced to compensate for the extra money you'll be receiving. Under the law, the two payments together cannot equal more than 80% of your average weekly wage prior to your injury. Refer to our Social Security Disability page for more information on this form of financial assistance.

    To qualify for unemployment assistance, the law states that you must be able to work. If your doctor and attorney find that you are eligible to receive temporary total or permanent total disability benefits, then you are not eligible to receive workers' compensation benefits at that time.

    Can I claim other benefits, such as workers' compensation, along with Social Security Disability?

    You can file for disability benefits under workers compensation and Social Security, but both agencies need to be notified. The SSA states that benefits "may be reduced if you are also eligible for...disability benefits from certain federal, state, or local government programs" as well. The insurance attorneys at the Coye Law Firm can consult you on the sources of disability benefits you may want to claim. Additionally, our law firm can ensure that the steps are carried out to satisfy agency requirements and aid in communication.

    Can I file a claim for an unlisted disability?

    Yes. Even if your impairment isn't listed on the Social Security website, they will still consider your claim if it interferes with your ability to work.

    Can I claim disability for my child's accident?

    If your child is unable to work because of his traumatic brain injury, he can apply for disability benefits. His disability began before his 22nd birthday, so he is eligible for benefits without having work credits.

    Can I file a claim for SSD because of back injuries?

    Not based on the word of a chiropractor alone. The SSA doesn't consider chiropractor evaluations to be enough evidence to prove a disability. In this case, MRIs and other medical evidence provided by medical doctors and treating physicians would greatly improve the chances of receiving benefits.

    Can I get benefits because of my depression?

    Possibly. This condition certainly keeps a person from working, but it might not be enough to meet the requirements of your disability insurance plan or those outlined by the Social Security Administration.

    I can't go to the doctor for treatment. Can I get benefits?

    Yes, but it may be more difficult. If you apply for benefits from the Social Security Administration, they might ask you to get a doctor's exam before they approve your claim. They pay for the exam, so you won't have to worry about payment or insurance.

    Can I still work and get Social Security Disability benefits?

    In short, yes. If you have a mental or physical limitation that prevents you from earning a federal minimum, then you may be eligible for benefits. This means that those who are still working but have limits put on the type or length of work they do may receive benefits if they earn less than $980 a month. This number changes, but a lawyer at the Coye Law Firm can help you determine if you are eligible for these benefits.

    What are the injury qualifications for claiming disability?

    A "disability" means that you have a medically verified injury, illness, or condition that keeps you from doing any work. This means that if you can perform sedentary work, you can't receive disability. A person with a broken leg could still work while sitting down, so they are not qualified to get benefits.

    How long can I collect benefits?

    The Social Security Administration will continue to pay benefits "as long as your medical condition has not improved and you cannot work." The agency will periodically review a beneficiary's disabled status to ensure that the system is not being taken advantage of. If your benefits end and you are still reasonably disabled, contact a Social Security disability lawyer at the Coye Law Firm.

    I've been disabled and out of work for 2 months. Can I claim SSD benefits?

    The law states that a person must be considered disabled for five months before receiving benefits. However, your case may have other areas of liability, including workers' compensation and personal injury. contact the Coye Law Firm to find out if you may collect benefits another way.

    Wouldn't a disability at age 60 be different from one at 25? What are the age requirements for Social Security Disability?

    An adult from ages 19 to 49 is considered "younger" and is deemed to have the ability to adapt to work other than the work the person has done in the past. For a "younger" person, unless certain special things are present, they must prove that they cannot do even the simplest job that exists in "significant numbers" anywhere in the United States.

    For a person from ages 50 to 54 (considered a person "closely approaching advanced age,"), they must prove that the medical condition limits them to no better than sedentary work (basically a sit down job), that he or she cannot do any work done in the previous 15 years, and that this work did not give him or her any skills which apply to sedentary work.

    For a person over 55 ("advanced age" or "closely approaching retirement age") the person must show that he or she is limited by the medical condition to no better than light work, that he or she cannot return to any job done in the last 15 years and that he or she has no work skills which could be applied to any other light or sedentary job which is similar in terms of industry, tools, and work processes to that which the person has done before.

    What do I need in order to file a claim?

    You'll need proof of your disability in order to file a successful disability claim. This means that doctor's records, treatment verification, prescriptions, and other medical documentation should be submitted along with your claim form. If your carrier requests or requires more information or paperwork, submit that as soon as you can to begin receiving benefits.

    I'm still working, Do I qualify for benefits?

    In 2010, a person making less than $1000 per month is not engaging in "substantial gainful activity." If their condition is expected to last at least 12 months, they can apply for disability benefits. Individuals who are working and disabled might have a harder time getting benefits, but they should apply as soon as they qualify.

    The Coye Law Firm wants to help you win benefits after your first application. Call our offices to speak with an attorney who can schedule you for a free consultation and guide you to a successful claim.

    How do I know if/when I will get benefits?

    After you apply for benefits, you will have to wait a few months to get a decision. Whether the Social Security Administration approved or denied your benefits, you will receive a letter in the mail stating their decision. The SSA begins paying benefits in the sixth month after a person's disability starts; this date is included in the letter sent to your home.

    Are disability benefits enough to live off of?

    The answer to this question depends on how you live your normal life. If you are used to living on limited income, then you may be able to survive on disability payments. Most people, however, find that these necessary benefits are not enough to live off of but better than nothing. If your claim is denied, you need an attorney to help speed up your appeal.

    The attorneys of the Coye Law Firm want to guide you through the disability process. If your claim has been denied, you need someone to fight for you and work within the Social Security Administration's complex appeals process. Call us today for a free consultation.

    Will trying to work stop my benefits?

    Not right away. You can participate in trial work programs and continue receiving disability payments. You can work and earn an income over what is considered "substantial gainful activity" for nine months, not necessarily consecutive, within a five year period. Once you reach this limit, your benefits will stop.

    Do I need to see a doctor before I apply for benefits?

    Not necessarily. If you are unable to see a doctor for your disabling illness, injury, or condition, you can still apply for benefits. The application process is faster when you can provide documentation for your ailment, but some people may not be able to afford a doctor's visit. If the Social Security Administration requires you to visit a doctor before they authorize benefits, they will pay for the exam.

    What do you mean by "disability"?

    The Social Security Administration defines a disability as "a medical condition that prevents you from working and that is expected to last for at least one year or result in death." They have a list of impairments that qualify a person for benefits, but your condition doesn't necessarily have to be on that list to get payments.

    Call 407.648.4940 or contact Coye Law Firm today for a free, private strategy session about your case.

    The expert disability attorneys at Coye Law Firm are experienced with Florida, New York, Michigan, and District of Columbia law and are here to help the disabled.

    Looking For More Information About Disability Law and Benefits?                                 Download an absolutely free copy of my Special Report on disability benefits.
    This invaluable resource is yours to keep with absolutely no obligation to us!

    My report explains the basics of disability benefits, and gives a few hints and tricks that could speed up your disability claim. 

    • 3 requirements you need to qualify for disability (Page 5)
    • The vital and crucial KEY to your disability claim (Page 7)
    • How to appeal a denied claim (Page 9)
    • How to maximize your benefits by combining different cases (Page 11)
    • Nine important tips to help win your disability case (Page 13)
    • And much more...

    Click here to request a copy now.

  • Frequently Asked Questions about Workers Compensation and Personal Injury Overlapped Cases

    Do I need two lawyers if I have an injury case and a workers comp case?

    It happens all the time, someone is injured at work, but it was due to the negligence of another person outside of work.  For instance, if you are driving a car or truck, get in an accident, you could have a car wreck case and a workers comp case. You may have a social security disability case, depending on the severity of the injury.  Interestingly, many injury law lawyers, don't really understand how one type of case can impact the other. Unfortunately, if your lawyer doesn't understand the finer points, you as the person injured could end up paying for that lack of knowledge and information. Some very reputable attorneys just don't understand the consequences.  If there is a possibility of an injury law case when you are hurt at work, you shouldn't take chances with such a problem. It's your case and your money.  There are but a handful of lawyers who truly practice in both areas- curiously none of the really large injury law firms have lawyers who typically handle both the job injury and injury law matters at the same time. At the very least, you owe it to yourself to have a complete understanding of the potential aspects of your case- early!   A strategic review of your case can give you the information you need to make a solid decision about your case.

    Can I see my own doctor?

    If you have sustained an injury at work, you must go see a worker's compensation approved doctor for your injury. The worker's compensation insurance company used by your work will assign you to a doctor.

    Will my cases settle together?

    The key in a worker's compensation and personal injury claim is that technically you have two seperate cases. Since you have two cases, they may settle at two different times. 

    How will I pay my medical bills?

    Your worker's comp insurance will pay for your medical bills, however once your personal injury case is settled, you may have to use the settlement to pay back the worker's comp insurance for those bills.

     

    Call 407.648.4940 or contact Coye Law Firm today for a free consultation about your case.

    The expert injury attorneys at Coye Law Firm are experienced with Florida, New York, Michigan, and District of Columbia law and are here to help the injured.

    If you'd like to learn more about injury law and your rights, read my book, Sharing the Secrets, Learning the Lies: A Guide to Florida Personal Injury

    From this book you will learn… 

    1. The ONE THING you must do within 14 days of your accident (page 46)
    2. The two most important factors in determining case value (page 8)
    3. How to understand what your insurance will and will not cover (chapter 3)
    4. 6 critical steps you must take after an accident (chapter 7)
    5. Why you should not trust the insurance company’s repair shop (page 78)
    6. How to choose the right doctor (chapter 5)
    7. A claim you could make against your own insurance company if your car is damaged, but not totaled (page 87)
    8. The secrets to getting a fair settlement (chapter 10)
    9. An 8-step breakdown of the normal process for lawsuits (page 121)
    10. The one 4-letter word that might cost you (chapter 12)
    11. How to start gathering the most important evidence you need (page 75)
    12. …and more!

    Click here to receive your FREE copy now. 

  • Frequently Asked Questions about Young Workers' Compensation

    I'm 19 and I was recently injured at work, what are my options?

    Younger workers are given special consideration when the average weekly wage is computed to arrive at a lost wages settlement. People under 22 years can expect to have their wages increase at rates faster than older workers, so their injuries may impede upon this. Therefore, reasonable measures are taken to compute the average weekly wage. An attorney can help to explain this process and make the computations according to the law.

     

     

     

    • Do You Still Have Questions?

    Call 407.648.4940 or contact Coye Law Firm today for a free consultation about your case.

    The expert injury attorneys at Coye Law Firm are experienced with Florida, New York, Michigan, and District of Columbia law and are here to help the injured.

    Discover POWERFUL SECRETS and COMMON LIES of Florida Workers' Compensation 


    If you are someone you know is struggling with the workers' comp process, get a FREE hard copy of my workers' compensation book and you will be squared away in no time!

    From my book you will learn...

    • The one thing you MUST do within 30 days of a work injury (page 16)
    • How to fill out a First Report of Injury form (page 20)
    • The first step you need to take to receive wage loss benefits (page 54)
    • What medical decisions your employer can make for you (page 26)
    • How to protect your benefits after being placed on light duty (page 38)
    • How to deal with rude workers' compensation doctors (page 39)
    • Disastrous workers' comp traps to avoid (page 83)
    • Others methods to pay for your medical costs (page 45)
    • What "maximum medical improvement" means for a claimant (page 63)
    • ...and much more.

    To receive your FREE copy, click here